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We're removing 10 more level crossings by 2025, bringing the total to 85 level crossings gone for good.

Sustainable landscaping and gardening feature in Bell to Moreland open space

08 Jul 2021

Clever landscaping for greener gardens

The length of open space between Coburg and Moreland Stations has been designed using sustainable landscaping principles.

These principles involve thoughtful plant selection and shaping the soil to make the most of Melbourne’s wet winters and drier summers.

Swales and retention basins act like dry creek beds, collecting excess water by redirecting water away from footpaths and roads. As a bonus, plants and trees around these landscaping features receive water deeper in the soil, creating strong growth and securing the topsoil.

Young eucalyptus trees planted around a small bioswale at Coburg Station

Young Kanooka Gum trees and ground cover plants around the small retention basin at Coburg Station

Retention basins are designed to store water during heavy rainfall events and discharge it slowly to the drainage network to prevent excess flow into the drains.

The basin also provides a source of drinking water for a variety of creatures that visit the area.

Wet pond living up to its name

Retention basin at Moreland Station

You can see swales and the retention basins being established right now. A layer of organic hessian matting provides erosion control for topsoil and protects the seedlings. Over time the matting will decompose providing further nutrient to soil and plants.

The Project team will be monitoring the swales and retention basin to ensure they settle in and do their job.

Woody Meadow: more flowers, more of the time

A native floral garden will feature along various parts of the open space corridor.

Woody Meadows are plantings of Australian shrubs. Plants chosen are selected for high flowering and overall attractiveness, plus their ability to reshoot to maximise floral display and longevity.

In addition to looking great, a Woody Meadow is a sustainable gardening method. Plants are selected for hardiness and drought tolerance and the garden beds require little maintenance.

Every two to four years the plants will be ‘coppiced’ (hard pruning of all stems close to the ground), which will encourage dense canopies that reduce weeds and promote flowering.

Woody Meadow is a collaborative project led by the University of Melbourne and is being rolled out across several Level Crossing Removal Project Sites.

Why not fill your life with flowers by creating a little Woody Meadow in your garden.

Woody Meadow at Birrarung Marr. Image credit: C Farrell, University of Melbourne

Woody Meadow at Birrarung Marr. Image credit: C Farrell, University of Melbourne

Woody Meadow at Royal Park. Image credit: R Bathgate, University of Melbourne

Woody Meadow at Royal Park. Image credit: R Bathgate, University of Melbourne

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